MISO SOUP!

By Published On: February 10th, 2019Categories: Chicken, Fish, Meals, Soup, Uncategorized0 Comments

I’ve been on a Miso kick and have made Miso Soup twice in two weeks. Mine is not a classic recipe, but it’s quite yummy. Miso is fermented soy bean paste, which sounds pretty disgusting, but is salty deliciousness! Traditionally Miso Soup is made from a Dashi broth.

Dashi is a Japanese stock. It’s a fundamental ingredient in many Japanese dishes. Dashi can be made from kombu (dried kelp), katsuobushi (dried and smoked bonito/skipjack tuna that is shaved into thin flakes), iriko or nibosh (anchovies/sardine), or a combination of all. I did have a can of both sardines and anchovies, but decided to try it with the chicken broth. It tasted surprisingly authentic!

MISO SOUP

I generally have a quart of chicken broth in the freezer so putting this soup together was fast and easy.

Ingredients:
1 qt. chicken stock or Dashi broth
1 clove garlic, minced
1″ knob of fresh ginger root, grated
1 large scallion, both white and green parts
1/2 cup firm tofu, cubed
3 Tbsp. White Miso paste*
1 sheet Nori seaweed, cut into 1 inch pieces
4 pieces Nori chips (optional, but if not using add more regular Nori)
1 Tbsp. soy sauce
1 Tbsp. Oyster (or fish) sauce

If you are using Dashi broth I don’t think you will need the soy sauce or Oyster sauce. I added those ingredients to bring out the umami flavor.

* Miso comes in many different colors (red, brown, white, etc.) and flavors. Its uses vary regionally throughout Japan.

 
I bought these chips at my local Safeway.
They are not that good on their own,
but worked well in the Miso Soup.
 

Preparation:
Bring 4 cups of chicken (or Dashi) broth to a boil. Add minced garlic, the white portion of the scallion sliced thinly, grated ginger root, soy sauce, oyster or fish sauce. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Add miso and stir until completely dissolved. Taste. Add more miso if needed. Drop in tofu cubes, and seaweed. Gently simmer 5 more minutes. Serve topped with the sliced greens of the scallion.

Miso Soup is commonly eaten for breakfast in Japan, often served with rice, eggs, fish or pickles. When my husband, Jerry and I were in Hawaii we had it every day for breakfast. It’s salty, but very satisfying and if you like a savory breakfast it’s a great way to start the day.

Next, I am going to experiment with Miso Glazed Pork Tenderloin and Crispy Garlic Miso Glazed Salmon.

All for today!
 
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